Symposium Sessions

2013 LSL Symposium E-Blast Header

The AG Bell 2013 Listening and Spoken Language Symposium offers a wide selection of session topics designed to highlight the pivotal moment in the history of deaf education in which we find ourselves today. Children and families are enjoying the benefits of early hearing detection, intervention and advances in technology—and we are called to help them make the most of those advances. We also face challenges and opportunities in meeting the needs of multiple cultures, generations and learning environments in the midst of rapidly evolving telepractice and communication technologies. Symposium sessions offer the opportunity for researchers, clinicians and educators to share data and evidence-based strategies in dynamic and interactive formats.

Friday, July 19, 2013
9:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Delivering LSL Services Via Telepractice: The Collaborative tVISIT Project

Elizabeth Cole, Ed.D., CCC-A, LSLS Cert. AVT, CREC Soundbridge
Barbara F. Hecht, Ph.D., Clarke Schools Boston

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

This session examines the tVISIT Project, or Telepractice Virtual Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers, a hybrid model of early intervention through which up to 80 families in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut receive both face-to-face and telepractice services. The project aims to compare home-visit and telepractice outcomes and collects information on attendance, participation, data collection, technology challenges, and time allocation, as well as information about parent and professional satisfaction, parent effectiveness, child performance, and the effects of telepractice on professional practices.  In particular, presenters will share preliminary findings on implementing a telepractice program, anticipated and unanticipated risks in moving from a face-to-face to telepractice service delivery model, parent participation and satisfaction, selecting evaluation tools to measure program effectiveness and the effects of telepractice on providing family-centered practice. The session also explores further influencing factors such as previous experience with technology, language differences and the health and medical needs of the family.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the benefits of adding a telepractice component to early intervention service delivery 
  • Be able to define what family-centered practice is and identify telepractice components that promote it 
  • Describe potential impacts of telepractice on the quality of professional practice and system change
Understanding and Supporting Parents of Children with Hearing Loss

Mary Beth Goring, M.A., MFT, John Tracy Clinic

Disclosure:
Financial — Employed by the John Tracy clinic and receives salary and speaking fees.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

When parents receive a diagnosis of hearing loss for their child, they often experience grief, a response unique to each individual that is best seen as a somewhat unpredictable cyclical process.  When faced with grieving parents, professionals may feel overwhelmed and may see grieving states as unhealthy and dysfunctional.  Conversely, parents may feel misunderstood by professional manners that appear detached or hostile. When professionals understand that the grief process is a natural and inevitable process, they are more likely to demonstrate empathic interest in the subjective experience of the parents they are serving.  This session explores ENUF—which stands for empathy, non-judgmental attitude, unconditional positive regard, and feeling-focus—an approach based on client-centered therapy that creates the conditions necessary for establishing trust and positive collaboration between parents and professionals.  Parents respond best to professionals who demonstrate interest in listening to their stories and understanding their affective experiences, encouraging trust and commitment to therapeutic approaches.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify parents’ grief states and the functions they serve 
  • Practice strategies for gaining parents’ trust and collaboration 
  • Practice effective strategies for delivering difficult news to parents
Facilitating Independence and Social Participation in School

Rosemary Richardson, Cert MRCSLT, LSLS Cert. AVT, Auditory Verbal UK

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

How can parents and professionals ensure that children with hearing loss participate fully in social interactions and are equipped with self-advocacy tools in mainstream settings? In this session, practitioners will learn how to work with parents to facilitate children’s transition into the mainstream kindergarten/primary school setting through an exploration of the Theory of Mind, which is considered crucial for social integration and participation. In particular, it will explore how to develop children’s Theory of Mind, present tools that equip them to advocate for themselves in their friendships and in the classroom, and explore how to communicate effectively as the team around the child. Best strategies from a myriad of transition courses taught at Auditory VerbalUK encourage professionals and parents to develop children’s thinking, problem solving and emotional maturity alongside listening and spoken language.  The session will emphasize group work using Auditory VerbalUK’s “Behaviors’ Checklist” as well as feedback forms and “take-home messages,” focusing on success and areas for future development.  

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify strategies to equip children who are deaf and hard of hearing to make and keep friends in the classroom
  • Review the key importance of theory of mind development in children who are deaf and hard of hearing
  • Identify and facilitate communication between child, teacher and parents with a view to developing self-advocacy skills for the real world
Learning Lab: Transformative Hearing Solutions for Children and Adults with Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

Carissa Moeggenberg, M.A., CCC-A

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

Over the past 20 years patient expectations for cochlear implant users have evolved from receiving basic lipreading cues to being able to hear while swimming or bathing. This presentation will provide a detailed overview of cochlear implant technology past, present and future.

Participants will be able to:

  • List the features and benefits of the Next Generation Sound Processor from Advanced Bionics 
  • Be able to identify who is a candidate for a cochlear implant 
  • Describe the performance outcomes seen with a cochlear implant
      

Friday, July 19, 2013
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
 

Mission (Im)Possible: Doing More With Less

Aleisha Davis, MPhil, MSLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, The Shepherd Centre
Donna Sperandio, M.Ed., LSLS Cert. AVT The Shepherd Centre

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

With the ongoing drive to provide ever improving services to more clients, clinical providers are being constantly challenged to do more with less. This session will outline the benefits and challenges of applying a service improvement framework using "Lean Thinking" for clinical professionals working in a range of settings with children with hearing loss in developing spoken language.  It will present evidence from a number of Lean Thinking projects at The Shepherd Centre such as room standardization, clinical reporting, standardization of forms and templates and process mapping, which led to a significant reduction in the time taken to do common clinical tasks, including a 52 percent reduction in the number of forms, a 91 percent reduction in report writing time, a 94 percent reduction in the time taken from completion of assessment to the signed report being filed and a 75 percent reduction in the length of reports.  Ultimately, these quality improvement projects increased clinicians’ morale, allowing them to optimize child and family care and service.

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand ‘Lean thinking’ and the core components and benefits of a service improvement framework 
  • Learn adaptable methods and strategies that can be applied to participants' own service delivery framework 
  • Identify areas of waste in participants' own workplace and leave the session with a ‘tool belt’ of resources to optimize the services they provide
If You Could Hear What I Hear

Joan Hewitt, Au.D., Project TALK / Pediatric Hearing Specialists
Laurie Owen, M.A., Project TALK / Pediatric Hearing Specialists

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

Children’s speech and language are the best reflection of what they hear.  However, children with hearing loss with additional disabilities such as autism, cognitive delays, and apraxia may have delayed or even minimal speech and language development.  How can audiologists, who see these children on a limited basis, ensure that they are receiving optimal benefit from their technology?  Intensive intervention and close collaboration of all the professionals and family members on the child’s team is the key.  This session will present formal and informal assessments for teachers, speech-language pathologists, and LSLSs to use when evaluating speech perception in young children with multiple disabilities with the aim of providing useful data to the audiologist in order to ensure optimal auditory access and assist nonverbal children in using their hearing technology and listening skills to the fullest.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify informal and formal assessments which can be used to evaluate the speech perception of young children 
  • Evaluate speech perception data in difficult to test populations to provide audiologists with guidance for HA and CI programming 
  • Develop professional collaboration strategies designed to ensure a child has optimal auditory access to speech and appropriate expectations for oral speech and language development
Maximizing Auditory-Verbal Therapy Through Social Networking & Online Media

K. Todd Houston, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, The University of Akron
Wendelyn L. DeMoss, M.S., CCC-SLP, Cert. AVT, DeMoss Consulting

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

Through the use of the Internet, social media, and online social networks, the ability to share information and connect with others is having a transformational effect on how people interact with each other. For LSLS professionals who are attempting to expand their reach and client base, online social engagement is no longer a choice but a necessity. Increasingly, the general public, colleagues, state agencies, and other service providers are turning online to establish direct ways of connecting, communicating, and collaborating.  The use of social media, smartphones/mobile media, tablet computers, and other Internet technology has created new opportunities for LSLS professionals to connect with colleagues, to mentor, or be mentored. More importantly, LSLS professionals are utilizing these technological applications to serve children with hearing loss and their families. This session will explore how LSLS professionals can leverage new social media and related technological applications to expand their services, collaboration and networking.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify current trends in social media and web-based technology
  • List at least three uses of social media, internet applications, or websites that will benefit current practice or service delivery
  • Compose a stepwise work plan to enhance  current practice or service delivery through the use of social media and/or related application
Learning Lab: Using MED-EL's BRIDGE Materials to Achieve Maximum Success at Any Level

Jeanne Fredriksen, M.Ed., CED

Disclosure:
Financial — Employed by MED-EL and received salary.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

This presentation aims to demonstrate how teachers and staff can identify current levels of functioning with measurable data, using support materials provided by MED-EL Corporation that focus on auditory development (LittlEARS), auditory training (Auditory Skills Checklist), and other areas often overlooked on Individualized Education Programs (MARCOF). Participants will learn how to monitor progress with ease in an orderly fashion and how to create a Transition Binder, a tangible tool for organizing this process. Further, the presentation will include access to information such as the Ling 6 Sound Check, the child’s device information, FM system compatibility, and general information related to hearing loss. Support materials will be reviewed and made available from MED-EL, including device management, teacher/staff training, peer training, and parent training.

Participants will be able to:

  • Review CI technology and device management from MED-EL Corporation
  • Become familiar with rehabilitation materials available from MED-EL Corporation and identify ways to use them to support current levels of functioning as well as monitor yearly progress 
  • Identify appropriate materials for the creation of a Transition Binder for mainstreamed students for classroom and building support needs.

 

Friday, July 19, 2013
3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
 

Practical Solutions for Modern Families

Joni Alberg, Ph.D.

This session will be a moderated discussion to present multiple models of service delivery to traditionally hard-to-serve families. These include, but are not limited to, families living in rural areas, families of lower socio-economic status, families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and children living in unstable conditions. Today’s telecommunication and internet technologies remove many barriers to service delivery, but not all of them. The solutions to overcoming attitudinal barriers, cultural differences, and life challenges such as economic disparities or family instability when seeking to deliver quality services to children and their families are best discovered in conversation with those who have lived these challenges. Families will share their challenges and solutions with professionals through guided discussion and in response to questions specifically designed to address the stated learning outcomes.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify at least two service delivery strategies to discuss with families living in rural areas 
  • Identify at least three effective practices when engaging in telepractice to deliver listening and spoken language intervention to children and families 
  • Be able to discuss the importance of cultural sensitivities when working with families who do not share the culture or language of the majority
When Paper and Excel Aren't Enough: Tracking Every Child's Development

Aleisha Davis, MPhil, MSLP, LSLS Cert. AVT

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

The current climate of early intervention settings for children with hearing loss is characterized with limited funding, swelling waitlists, rising caseloads and increasing requirements to supply in-depth reporting on child and service outcomes. This session examines how these challenges have been addressed in a not-for-profit early intervention setting in Sydney, Australia, using evidence-based practices and outcome data from the Child Development Information System (CDIS). With a strong focus on individual family intervention, which integrates each family’s vision for their child, this system model includes organizational reporting requirements, electronic health records, streamlining administrative tasks and processes including online fund claims and electronic appointment book and diary management. Further, participants will learn about snapshot and longitudinal tools for the tracking of children’s rate of progress in developmental areas, along with the inbuilt flagging system to identify areas of concern to guide and focus individual family intervention that may not have been possible in a traditional therapy model.

Participants will be able to:

  • Be able to identify areas of need and future areas for focused intervention by concurrently tracking children’s individual development in the areas of audition, speech, language and cognition 
  • Learn how to address the growing requirements to supply in-depth reporting on child and service outcomes in their own clinical setting 
  • Examine a number of tracking tools including monitoring children’s functional access to sound and listening development through an auditory hierarchy, receptive and expressive language acquisition of morphemes, question structures, mean length of utterance and development through play, cognition, pragmatics and pre-literacy checklists
Training and Advocacy Group - Social Skills Training with Students from Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

Maura Martindale, Ed.D., LSLS Cert. AVEd, California Lutheran University
Leah Ilan, M.A., Training and Advocacy Group

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

The Training and Advocacy Group (TAG) was formed in 2006 with the goal of helping students with hearing loss to successfully integrate into mainstream settings. The more focused and specific purpose of the program is to provide upper elementary and middle school students with concrete supports in learning how to navigate the social and identity issues which often occurr upon leaving their more protective early elementary school environments.  For students with hearing loss who come from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, social skills needed to succeed in inclusive settings may not have been the priority of parents and professionals. Through a needs assessment analysis and a qualitative data analysis of TAG participants since 2006, this session will explore the three distinct needs which consistently created barriers to success in school for culturally and linguistically diverse student populations and how participation in TAG addressed these challenges. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the social challenges of older students who are deaf and hard of hearing who use spoken language 
  • List successful interventions for promoting self-advocacy 
  • List successful interventions for increasing social skills


Learning Lab: Hamilton CapTel®: A Trusted Solution for Individuals with Hearing Loss
Mitchell Levy, Product Manager, Hamilton CapTel
David Blanchard, Marketing Program Manager, Hamilton CapTel

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

This hands-on presentation will demonstrate the different captioned telephone solutions offered through Hamilton CapTel®. Participants will learn how to use Hamilton CapTel on smartphones and tablets as well as on a PC or Mac and how to obtain a personalized Hamilton CapTel Call Me number for receiving calls. The Hamilton CapTel phone easily connects via Ethernet or WiFi and includes a built-in answering machine. Finally, participants will learn about the new Hamilton CapTel Holistic Hearing Healthcare Program and the benefits it brings to healthcare professionals as well as to people with hearing loss. 

Participants will:

  • Learn how Hamilton CapTel can be life-changing for individuals with hearing loss. 
  • Learn how to use Hamilton CapTel service on a variety of devices and how to register for a Hamilton CapTel account and/or obtain a Hamilton CapTel phone.  
  • Be aware of the tools and knowledge to be able to recommend Hamilton CapTel to others. 

Saturday, July 20, 2013
9:30 – 11:30 a.m.
 

The Transition from Early Intervention to School: Examining Effective Practices

Deirdre Curle, M.S., University of British Columbia

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

Parents of children with hearing loss have found the transition from family-centered early intervention to the child-centered school system has been found to be a confusing time, yet there is virtually no documented research on the topic to guide parents, educators, or policymakers. Research findings will be shared which suggest that the transition is facilitated by advance preparation for parents and by collaboration between the early intervention programs and the school system. There is also a need for clear, specific and easily accessible web-based information on the Internet.  The presentation will conclude with recommendations for professionals regarding best practices for facilitating transition to school for children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

Participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the current U.S. federal laws and guidelines regarding transition from Part C to Part B 
  • Summarize the current research findings on transition to school for families of children with special needs, including hearing loss 
  • Describe factors that facilitate or hinder a successful transition from the early intervention system to school
Collaboration: Creating an Effective Learning Environment

Samantha Domingos, M.E.D., Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
Heather Stinson, CAGS, M.E.D., S/LP-A, Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

With advancements in early identification and amplification of young children with hearing loss, students are increasingly educated in mainstream schools alongside peers with typical hearing with support from itinerant teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing from an early age.  Many students with hearing loss can fall “under the radar” due to strong early intervention services and good speech abilities.  However, they continue to face challenges with auditory access as well as demonstrating linguistic, phonetic, and schematic gaps which can lead to long-term educational consequences. Thus, partnerships between classroom teachers and itinerant teachers is critical in ensuring that students with hearing loss receive comprehensive services throughout their school day. This session will describe the challenges that students face in the mainstream classroom as a direct result of their hearing loss and provide specific strategies for partnerships and collaboration between intinerant and classroom teachers to address these challenges in a manner consistent with differentiated instruction and best practices.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the process for identifying specific educational challenges faced by students with hearing loss in mainstream classroom
  • Explain why students with hearing loss face linguistic, phonetic, and schemat gaps 
  • List specific strategies for collaborating with classroom teachers to address such learning gaps and improve educational outcomes
On Becoming Multi-culturally Competent Practitioners

Ellen Rhoades, Ed.S., LSLS Cert. AVT, Auditory Verbal Training

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

The realization that American and Canadian populations are incredibly diverse in many ways has been growing exponentially. It is imperative that Listening and Spoken Language Specialists be fully aware of the recommended multicultural competencies and influential factors as they continue to develop programs, provide services and counsel families of children with hearing loss. Three essential and categorical competencies have been identified: (1) awareness of our own assumptions, values, biases; (2) understanding the worldview of those from various cultures; (3) developing appropriate intervention strategies and techniques. Each level involves three levels as practioners move from awareness to knowledge to skill. This session will address these issues and share empirical findings, strategies, best practices and recommendations. The session will provide a questionnaire for participants to use in their practice and include a discussion of effective communication styles with parents who are culturally and linguistically diverse. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the veracity of two statements pertaining to multiculturalism and its influential factors 
  • Respond accurately to a question regarding evidence-based problematic issues pertaining to cultural diversity 
  • Identify three strategies considered effective for culturally sensitive parent counseling

Learning Lab: Baby Beats: An Early Intervention Approach and Resource for Parents

Valeri LeBeau, M.S., CCC-SLP

Since the age of cochlear implantation has decreased, family centered resources need to fully support the pre-verbal stage of langauge development, especially through musical activities which naturally develop the areas of attachment, listening and communication. Some early intervention service providers are challenged to provide regular support for families of babies due to distance and infants' sleeping and eating routines. For parents and young children, the home provides a safe and secure environment to develop listening and communication skills. This presentation will illustrate a sustainable model, providing family guidance and a practical musical early intervention resources that can be delivered in the home and reflects the increasing benefits children receive from early implantation and the latest technology.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the early intervention musical resource working in synthesis with latest technology supports the development of pre-verbal skills 
  • List evidence to support an effective early intervention musical program 
  • Describe the parental qualitative outcomes in support of a family-centered habilitation program

Saturday, July 20, 2013
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
 

Early Intervention Services for Deaf children in Rural Tamilnadu – India/DHVANI -Literacy Programme for Young Deaf children

Meera Suresh, Ph.D., Balavidyalaya The School for Young Deaf Children
Valli Annamalai, Ph.D., Balavidyalaya The School for Young Deaf Children

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

This session will explore the early intervention program for young children who are deaf and hard of hearing at Balavidyalaya—The School For Young Deaf Children in India, which works to develop early spoken language and literacy skills in children with hearing loss as a precursor to entering mainstream educational environments. Special educators and parents are equal partners in this endeavor to provide the children with a continuous input of meaningful spoken language and facilitate their use of their residual hearing to listen, observe and comprehend what is spoken. At the program’s completion, children are able to read fluently with comprehension and their reading level is slightly higher than that of their peers with typical hearing.  Graduates of the program are integrated into mainstream schools all over India, the UAE, Singapore, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and the U.S. and many have received high academic degrees and thrive in mainstream society. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the prerequisites for starting and running cost effective early intervention centers in rural and hard to reach areas 
  • Identify techniques used in the DHVANI methodology to develop literacy skills and the importance of receptive language as a prerequisite for literacy  
  • Receive information on how to garner government and community participation
Reggio Emilia: Quality Service Delivery for Preschool DHH Families

Julie Heimler, M.Ed., LSLS Cert. AVEd, John Tracy Clinic
Angela Stokes, M.S.Ed, John Tracy Clinic

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

This session examines the fundamental concepts of the Reggio Emilia approach of teaching and how it can be used in a preschool setting for students who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH). The presentation will look at how the staff of the John Tracy Clinic has successfully adapted the Reggio Emilia philosophy to support listening and spoken language, critical thinking skills, self-advocacy, and confidence in the children served.  The Reggio Emilia teaching philosophy facilitates meeting the demands of a faster-paced, more technologically advanced world, while still maintaining a child-centered, hands-on learning environment.  The course will examine the ways in which using Reggio Emilia is/was an effective way to learn for families and children from many cultures as well as ways in which the philosophy may present a challenge in a DHH classroom. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and brainstorm possibilities for incorporating Reggio Emilia-inspired ideas in DHH settings.

Participants will be able to:

  • Become familiar with, and be able to identify, aspects of the Reggio Emilia approach 
  • Be able to identify potential pros and cons of Reggio Emilia in a DHH classroom 
  • Consider possibilities for incorporating aspects of Reggio Emilia in participants' own (DHH) settings/environments
eHab - Cochlear Implant Habilitation via Skype

Jayne Simpson Allen, M.Ed.,Dip.T, LSLS Cert. AVT, LSLS Cert. AVT

Disclosure:
Financial — No relevant financial relationships exist.
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

This presentation will demonstrate how the Northern Cochlear Implant Program helps to overcome the issue of distance for children who require cochlear implant habilitation and their parents throughout the north island of New Zealand via Skype (eHab). Cochlear implant habilitation requires highly skilled parents because they are the primary educators of, and advocates for, their children. The session will present an analysis  of the current program, along with videos demonstrating the eHab sessions in various settings.  The students in the program range in age from 4 to 19 years, and the majority attend their local school. Many of the students have English as a second language, and many have had a deteriorating hearing loss leading to cochlear implantation. In addition to weekly, bi-weekly or monthly eHab lessons, habilitationists visit the families at their homes four times a year to model strategies and conduct assessments. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand how to use Skype to communicate with families and teachers 
  • Work towards overcoming the barrier of distance in providing regular auditory-verbal therapy/cochlear implant habilitation 
  • Plan therapy/habilitation sessions for the Skype medium
Learning Lab: Maximizing Individual Outcomes –Infants to Seniors Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Andrew Kendrick, LSLS Cert. AVT, Global Rehabilitation Manager, Cochlear Ltd.

Disclosure:
Financial — Cochlear Ltd - received salary
Nonfinancial — No relevant nonfinancial relationships exist.

Cochlear Ltd. has a comprehensive portfolio of rehabilitation resources to support people with hearing loss at every stage of their life—from infants through seniors. Early intervention resources include the Sound Foundation series, a three-year support program for parents and clinicians with hundreds of games, activities and ideas for developing spoken language through listening. LEAPing on with Language is a higher level language program to support parents and school-aged children in developing complex conversations, abstract thinking and concepts such as humor, jargon, idioms, and sarcasm. The Adult Aural Rehabilitation Guide supports the clinician working with adults within a developmental framework. Hope Notes is a music program for teens to adults to support their increased enjoyment of music. Many of these resources are available free on the web.

Participants will become familiar with:

  • The comprehensive portfolio of resources to support listening and spoken language - early intervention.
  • To become familiar with the comprehensive portfolio of resources to support achieving best possible outcomes for school aged and teens.
  • To become familiar with Cochlear's portfolio of resources to support best individual outcomes - adults